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Home Newsletters NL-1-2014-LETTER-10-NEW DEADLY VIRUS SPARKS CONCERN
NL-1-2014-LETTER-10-NEW DEADLY VIRUS SPARKS CONCERN PDF Print E-mail

 

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NEW DEADLY VIRUS SPARKS CONCERN

Sarumathy S, Dr.V.Ravichandiran and Mohammed Sulaiman Sait J

Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vels University

The ministry of France has recently reported some latest cases of novel coronavirus (NCoV) and according to the WHO, death cases have been reported because of this virus.


Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), formerly called "novel coronavirus (nCoV)," was identified in 2012 in Saudi Arabia. The NCoV was recently discovered for the first time in humans and cases have occurred across six countries: Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Jordan, the United Kingdom, the United Arab Emirates and France. Coronaviruses are named for the crown-like spikes on their surface. They are common viruses that most people get in their lifetime[1]. These viruses usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses.

Coronaviruses may also infect animals. Most of these coronaviruses usually infect only one animal species or, at most, a small number of closely related species. However, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus can infect people and animals, including monkeys, Himalayan palm civets, raccoon dogs, cats, dogs and rodents. The nCoV similar to the common cold virus attacks the respiratory system. Symptoms include fever, cough, and shortness of breath.  This novel strain is different from the coronavirus that caused SARS in 2003. Investigators are trying to find out the source and transmission of the virus.

Most people who got infected with MERS-CoV developed severe acute respiratory illness with symptoms of fever, cough and shortness of breath. About half of them died. A small number of the reported cases had a mild respiratory illness. Investigators are trying to figure out the source of MERS-CoV and how it spreads.

The above table shows WHO report on the number of cases and deaths caused due to this novel coronavirus (nCoV) [2]

Some recent studies have also shown that the main cause for the spread for this infection is cause of direct person to person contact and could also be possible through respiratory droplets [3].

The Centre for Disease control (CDC) continues to recommend the use of airborne-infection isolation rooms for patients with SARS and MERS-CoV. Cohorting of patients in one floor or unit is a viable strategy to devote resources and staff to the care of patients [4].

Conclusion

The World Health Organization (WHO), CDC and other partners are working to better understand the possible risks from MERS-CoV to the public.

References

1. http://www.who.int/csr/disease/coronavirus_infections/IPCnCoVguidance_06May13.pdf

2. http://www.who.int/csr/don/archive/disease/coronavirus_infections/en/index.html

3. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc1311004 /New England Journal of Medicine October 31, 2013 369(18):1761.

4. http://www.cdc.gov/sars/guidance/I-infection/healthcare.pdf

 

 

 

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